Artists Profiles

artists hands
We are privileged to work with many well known Aboriginal artists in Australia, winners or finalists of some of the most prestigious awards, both local and overseas. Please find below profiles of the Aboriginal artists that display their artworks in our gallery.

Aaron Cora
Born: 1981
Died: 2016
Tribe: Bundjalong Nation
Traditional name: Joongi (Brolga)

Aaron Cora got into art at young age. He was inspired by his people from Bundjalong and continually strived to embrace his Aboriginal heritage.
Aaron was a very cultural man and kept close connection to their culture, customs, tradition and their ancestors which were very important to Him.
Aaron’s artwork was very abstract, portraying different rays of light through rain drops and water, all very based on nature, which created his true unique style.
His art products have displayed in art galleries, Murwillumbah and Byron-bay. Local of Tweed Heads had strong family ties from the south east QLD and Northern NSW legions.
It was likely that he would have become one of the leaders in the Aboriginal art world and even though his life was taken away too soon, his culture continues to live on.
His totem animal, the Brolga is very special, representing a bird, one of the creation ancestors that taught us how to dance, which was his passion in life besides painting.

ABIE LOY KEMARRE
Born: 1972, at Utopia station approximately 250km north-east of Alice Springs.
Language Group: Anmatyerre

Abie Loy Kemarre was born in 1972 at Utopia station approximately 250km north-east of Alice Springs. Abie lives at Mosquito Bore with her family. Her grandmother is the acclaimed Kathleen Petyarre. Abie speaks Eastern Anmatyerre. Abie Loy has been painting since 1994 under the guidance of her grandmother, Kathleen. Abie paints the Bush Hen Dreaming which she inherited from her grandmother. Her work is representational of the Bush Hen travelling through the country looking for bush seeds that are scattered over the land as is illustrated by the fine dotting. She also depicts body paint designs used in traditional women’s sacred ceremonies. The body paint used consists of natural ochres that are applied with the fingers by the women. These ceremonies are performed with song and dance cycles telling stories of the Bush Hen Dreaming. This Bush Hen Travels through the country looking for bush plums and bush tomatoes that bear a yellow fruit called Arkitjira. Bush plums are also found in this area and are eaten by both the people of this area and the Bush Hen.

Abie Loy Kemarre’s unique style of art has brought her critical acclaim and she now stands at the cutting edge of the Australian contemporary art movement. Abie’s works are held in major collections all over the world and she has been exhibited extensively both nationally and internationally.

AWARDS:
2001 finalist in 18th Telstra NATSIAA
1997 finalist in 14th Telstra NATSIAA

Solo Exhibitions (selection)
2004 Abie Loy Kemarre, Solo Exhibition, Gadfly Gallery, Perth, WA July-August
2003 Abie Loy Kemarre, First solo Exhibition, Alcaston Gallery, Melbourne, Victoria, September-October

Group Exhibitions (selection)
2004 – Arrnkerthe, New Paintings, Coo-ee Gallery, NSW, November
2003 – Abie Loy Kemarre, Recent paintings, Fire-works Gallery, Brisbane, QLD, June-July
2002 – Abie Loy & Violet Patyarre, Recent Paintings Mary place Gallery, Paddington, NSW, November
2001 – 15th Telstra National Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Art Exhibition, Darwin, NT August
2000 – The Collection, Gallerie Australis, Adelaide, SA, March-April
– Utopia, Framed Gallery, Darwin, NT, March

ANTHONY WALKER
Aboriginal heritage – Yiman/Gurrang Gurrang
Anthony is a senior custodian of Didgeridoo/Yidaki at Yiyyakala.
Anthony is from Byron Bay, NSW. Anthony was taught how to make didgeridoos by Djalu Gurravirri, the Didgeridoo Master and also by his grand father, Alf Walker. He also creates fine art and does aboriginal performances.

Awards:
• 2005 National Parks Aboriginal Art Awards – Winner
• 2005 Parliament Award/Sydney – Finalist
• 2006 Parliament Award/Sydney – Finalist
• 2006 Mil-Pra – Finalist
• 2007 Marine art Award/Byron Bay – Winner
• 2008 Gold Coast Indigenous Art and Design Award T2 – Winner

AUDREY CALMA
Audrey CALMA comes from Melville Island,home to the Aboriginal people,the Tiwi, which is Australia’s second largest island after Tasmania and, across Clarence Strait, only 80 kilometres north of Darwin.
In her painting ‘Bush Tucker Dreaming’ depicts a Tiwi women’s Dreaming Story about ‘Bush Tucker’. It shows the different foods they go out to gather, and the circles around each of the foods indicate the amount of ground they have to search to find all of the goods.
The aboriginal women are the gatherers of the Tribe, the men are the Hunters. So the women only gather such things as Witchetty/Witjuti Grubs,(in the centre) tasty grubs which are like borers and found in live wood in stems, trunks and roots of certain wattles.
Benita Oliver
Tribe: Keringke
Region: Utopia,Central Australia

Benita Oliver is an original Keringke artist, inspired by her family’s culture.
Benita started at the Art Centre in 1987, and has been involved in many of their exhibitions.
Benita uses fine dotting technique with beautiful bright colours.
She paints on a variety of different mediums including silk, paper canvas and ceramics. Her artwork features fine details and clean lines and the use of mirror imaging. Her colours are very vibrant and personally expressive.

BIBI BARBA
Bibi Barba was born in Roma and raised in Liverpool, Sydney, the daughter of Aboriginal Featherweight boxing champion Buddy Claire. Bibi has a sense of design and colour and a strong sense of story-telling. Bibi’s work has a real vitality, such freshness in the colours. Bibi’s art is accessible and decorative, they are instantly recognisable, but not predictable.
Bibi has exhibited her work in solo and group exhibitions throughout Australia. In 2001 she was part of an Australia Art exhibition touring Europe.
Her work is held in number of private collections not only in Australia but also in the United Kingdom, New Zealand, Switzerland, Germany, New York and South Carolina in the United States.
BRYCE MORAN
TRIBE: Dunghutti, NSW

Bryce grew up in Kempsey (Dunghutti Country), where he attended an Aboriginal School in Greenhill, which is located on the out skirt of Kempsey.
After eight years the family moved on to Armidale, which is located on Aniawan Country that’s where he finished school at an early age (Class: Year 6).
Bryce’s knowledge of Aboriginal Culture was learnt through their Elders, by listening and respecting and knowing where he comes from.
Bryce’s been painting since the 1980’s, using Charcoal, Ochre and carving Emu eggs as a hobby. Over the years he’s worked as a seasonal worker around Australia, then a park worker for the National Parks and Wildlife Service in the New England District, which is located on Aniawan Country.
Bryce then moved south to Wollongong, NSW, known as Wodi Wodi Country. There he’s worked for the Department of Education for 16 years, assisting and teaching children from K/6, he’s also taught Aboriginal Art within these schools.
Now Bryce lives in Logan City, Qld since the year 2000.

CHRIS CREBBIN
Area: Sydney, New south Wales

Born in Sydney, Australia, Chris Crebbin was brought up as an Australian Aborigine. His mother was born on the Aboriginal reserve of Palm Island where his grandmother was taken as part of the “stolen generation.”
Painting under his Aboriginal name of “Burthurmarr” meaning brolga (native companion), his work have sold internationally.
His art has always been a very personal journey into his past and present, the sharing of himself, his stories and his culture on canvas.

COLIN WIGHTMAN
1965 – 2015
From: Toomelah mission
Tribe: Goomeroi tribe

Colin comes from Toomelah mission, a small aboriginal community on the dry plain near the western border of N.S.W. Toomelah is the Aboriginal word for ‘those who move from place to place’ and it reflects very much the lifestyle he has chosen.
He has been an artist for over 18 years, the Goomeroi tribesman just loves to paint. The Goomeroi tribe can be found in the southern part of Queensland and northern end of inland New South Wales. Colin creates indigenous art because he loves it and he is good at it. He paints what he sees and the old stories which handed down from his ancestor.
In 2004 Colin was awarded Male Artist of The Year by the Toomelah/ Boggabilla community. In 2005 he was a finalist in Parliament of New South Wales Indigenous Art Prize.
Sadly, Colin payed away in 2015.

DJARDI ASHLEY
Born: October 1950(deceased 2008)
Region: Ramingining, Central Arnhemland
Country: Ngilipitji
Language Bloc: Yolngu
Language: Rittharrngu
Local Group (Clan): Wagilag
Social Affiliations: Dhuwa moiety, Burralang subsection

Djardi was born in 1951 at Djoindi, an outstation of Yirrkala, north astern Arnhem Land. It is known as the stone spear country, associated with the journey of the Wagilag sisters, and his tribe is Wagilag, dua moiety. During his early life Djardi watched his father, (ceremonial leader of the tribe) as he painted on bark. IN time Djardi became a highly respected artist.
Djardi moved from Doindji to Ramingining when he married Dorothy, and they had five girls and three sons. He has been given permission to paint some of the dreamings of his wife, and together they have exhibited at important national exhibitions, including the Aboriginal Artists’ Gallery in Melbourne in 1986, when ten of their paintings were acquired for the Robert Holmes a Court collection, the Esplanade Gallery, Darwin, 1988 and the Cooee Gallery in Sydney 1990. Djardi has also had solo exhibitions at the Douglas Burns Art Museum and at the Flinders University Art Museum in South Australia in 1991. Because of ceremonial duties as one of the leaders of sacred rites, he is not able to paint as often as he would like and his works are very difficult to acquire.

Some of his Awards:
• 1987 First Prize, National Aboriginal Art Award, NT Museum of Arts and Sciences, Darwin
• 1993 Interpreting Mabo Award, one third share, Botany Art Awards, NSW

DOROTHY NAPANGARDI
c.1950 – June 2013
Dorothy Napangardi (born early 1950s – 1 June 2013) was a Warlpiri speaking contemporary Indigenous Australian artist born in the Tanami Desert and worked in Alice Springs.

Dorothy Napangardi was the daughter of Indigenous Australians Jeannie Lewis Napururrla and Paddy Lewis Japanangka, born in the early 1950s in a location referred to as Mina Mina, near Lake Mackay in the Tanami Desert. Napangardi (in Warlpiri) or ‘Napangati’ (in Western Desert dialects) is a skin name, one of sixteen used to denote the subsections or subgroups in the kinship system of central Australian Indigenous people. These names define kinship relationships that influence preferred marriage partners and may be associated with particular totems.

Dorothy began painting in 1987 at the “Centre for Aboriginal Artists”. Her initial works were highly influenced by Eunice Napangardi in particular, as they share a number of stories, close friends and are of the same skin group and both paint Bush Banana Dreaming.

Dorothy lived a traditional life style until the early 1960’s when her family group walked in to the pastoralist station of Mt Doreen. Holding a senior position in the field of traditional law within the Warlpiri society, Dorothy’s works play an integral role in the preservation and communication of her Dreamings. When painting Women’s Dreamings she refers to the Mina Mina site, which is a highly significant site as it is recognized as the point of origin for Karntakurlangu Jukurrpa (Women’s Dreaming) for both the Kukuja and Warlppiri. Containing two large clay pans and numerous water soakages the land is relatively fertile. It is also thought to be the place where the digging sticks originated, emerging from the ground during the era of creation.

In 1991 Dorothy won the Museum’s and Art Gallery’s Award for the best artwork in Western Media at the National Aboriginal Art Award. This work is now part of a permanent collection for the Museum and Art Galleries of the Northern territory. In 2001 Dorothy won the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art Award

Dorothy passed away on June 1st 2013

Selected Awards and collections
1991
• Museums and Art Galleries Award (Best painting in European media), National Aboriginal Art Award, Northern Territory Museum of Arts and Sciences, Darwin
1999
• Highly Commended, 16th NATSIAA, Museum and Art Gallery of NT, Darwin
2001
• First Prize, 18th NATSIAA, Museum and Art Gallery of Northern Territory, Darwin
• Artbank, Sydney
• Art Gallery of South Australia
• Linden Museum, Stuttgart, Germany
• Museum and Art Galleries of the Northern Territory
• National Gallery of Australia, Canberra
• National Gallery of Victoria
• Queensland Museum
• South Australian Festival Centre Foundation
• The Australia Council Collection, Sydney
• The Erskine Collection, NSW
• The Homesglen Institute of TAFE Collection, Victoria
• The Kaplan-Levi Collection, Seattle, USA.
• The Kelton Foundation, Santa Monica, LA, USA.
• The Kerry Stokes Collection, Perth, WA
• The Vroom Collection, The Netherlands

EVELYN PULTARA
Evelyn Pultara was born around 1940 at Woodgreen Station, the cattle property adjoining Utopia Station, north east of Alice Springs. She is an Anmatyerre woman and the mother of six children.
Evelyn began painting in 1997. Her early works were paintings on traditional themes of bush tucker and awelye (women’s ceremonial body paint designs). Now Evelyn exclusively paints her totem, the bush yam.Like her late aunt Emily Kame Kngwarreye and her full brother Greeny Purvis, Evelyn Pultara was born with bush yam (pencil yam) as her totem. Greeny and Evelyn are the only two Anmatyerre speakers who are allowed to paint the Bush Yam represented in lines, depicting the transition of the seasons.

Solo exhibitions:
• 2003 June Solo Exhibition, Sydney
• 2004 May ‘Evelyn Pultara’ curated by Armida Aallevi, aborigena, Milan, Italy, London, Melbourne
• 2005 Feb ‘The Art of Evelyn Pultara’ Sydney
• 2005 Raintree Gallery, Darwin NTGroup exhibitions:
• 2004 Twenty Indigenous Female Artists From Central Australia, Ann
• 1993 Yapakurlangu Jirrama, Batchelor College, Tennant Creek, NTAwards:
• 2005 Winner, general painting, Telstra, 22nd National Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Award, Darwin, NT

FLYNN J. WALLACE
TRIBE: Jirrbal
FROM: Ravenshoe – North Queensland
BORN: 1942

Flynn is from Jirrbal Tribe that is the ‘Rainforest Tribe in North Queensland. Many of his paintings depict creatures in nature including Australian native birds, butterflies and native plants.
He studied Fine Art at the University. He worked as a pilot of aircraft and had been sketching and painting as a hobby. After he retired from his pilot job he shifted his career to his aboriginal painting work.
He published a book for blind children which is 3-dimensionally created for them to feel with their fingertip. Many of his paintings are inspired by the stories given to him by his mother.

GARMARROONGOO MICHAEL HUDDLESTON
His father, the late Harry Huddleston, was a traditional owner from Burrungu, also known as Ruin City.Most of his artwork is based on this land which his father and mother came from.
He paints on canvas in acrylic. All the animals are painted in the traditional ways of their land and in Dreamtime stories.
Michael Huddleston has been painting for 20 years and has paintings all over the world.
George Tjungurrayi
Born: c1947
Skin Name: Tjungurrayi/Jungarai
Language: Pintupi
Region: Kiwirrkurra, Western Desert

George [Hairbrush] Tjungurrayi was born near Kiwirrkurra in the Gibson Desert, Western Australia. His homeland is clay-pan type country in which soakage water is used by the travelling men and the small flesh ‘mungilypa’ shrub that grows profusely in this region. He came in from the desert via Mount Doreen and Yuendumu.

In the mid 1970’s both George and his older brother Willy, also an established Pintupi artist, commenced their painting careers as apprentices for Papunya Tula Artists. George has painted at various locations, including Mt Liebig (Yamunturrngu) and Kintore (Walungurru), and at the Yayayi and Waruwiya outstations, working alongside Joseph Jurra Tjapatjarri and Ray James Tjangala. His subject matter references is his ancestral country, its Tingari Stories and the various sites surrounding the area such as Wala, Kiwirrkura, Lake Mackay, Kulkuta, Karku, Ngaluwinyamana and Kilpinya, north-west of Kintore in the Western desert in central Australia.

In 1998 with the passing of his brother, who was a member of the Papunya Tula desert art movement, a degree of important cultural responsibility passed across to George. He developed a distinctive painting style with dense parallel line structures marked out with shimmering rows of dotting.
Originally his artwork employed the typical Western Desert image bound to subtle hues, however his art style has evolved and re-shaped to include the brighter hues which dominates his canvases.

George spends the most of his time with his wife, Nanupu Nangala and family in his community in Kintore, west of Alice Spring.

George Tjungurrayi was voted “the most collectable artist”, by magazine, Australian Art Collector and his artwork has been exhibited in widely in Australia and many other countries worldwide.

GLORIA TAMERRE PETYARRE
Born: c1938, Mosquito Bore, Utopia, Northern Territory
Other names: Gloria Tamerre Petyarre, Pitjara
Language Group: Anmatyerre

Gloria Petyarre is, one of the most significant, famous, and internationally acclaimed, contemporary Australian female Aboriginal artists.

Gloria is married to Ronnie Price and has four sisters, Ada Bird Peyarre, Violet Petyarre, Myrtle Petyarre, Nancy and Kathleen Petyarre- who are all renowned artists.

She hails from the eastern desert community of Utopia, 230 kilometres nokrtheast of Alice Springs. The region’s art movement began in the late 1970’s when a batik fabric-making workshop was introduced to the community. Gloria joined the community and was on her way to becoming one of the most widely recognised indigenous artists.

Gloria first became known as an artist for her contributions to Utopia Batik Exhibition which toured Australia and overseas from 1977 to 1987. She began using acrylic paint on canvas in 1988, because it gave her greater freedom of expression and better control over the results.

Along with Emily Kame Kngwarreye, Gloria is known as one of the most stylistically adventurous painters. While she contains her subject matter within the bounds of the traditional, her expression is free and vivid. While Gloria’s palette is often ochre-based, her works are noted for their fluidity and movement. In this painting, “Medicine Leaves”, for example, Gloria manages to capture the essence of subject in both an artistic and spiritual sense.

Gloria spends days in contemplative peace while painting, reflecting on her country and the stillness. “You look … see / in my mind … quiet place my country. This on leaf … plenty wind coming.”

It is in this manner that Gloria has captured the imagination of both modernists and traditionalists. The range of brush strokes and colours represent the leaves beneath mulga trees at different times of the year, lifted and swirled up by the wind. Through out the life of this particular native shrub, the leaves change colour and changes its medicinal properties accordingly.

In 1990 she traveled with the exhibition “Utopia: a Picture Story” to Dublin, London, Thailand and India. In 1999 she wont the Wynne Prize for landscapes of the Art Gallery of New South Wales. Her first solo show was in 1991 and since then has had many exhibitions including New York and London.

Awards:
1993-Design for tapestry for Victorian Tapestry Work shop
1993-Mural for Kansas City Zoo
1999-Wynne Prize, Art Gallery of New South Wales

Selected Exhibitions:
2010 – Dacou Gallery, Melbourne, Vic
2009 – New Works, Big Leaves, Kate Owen Gallery, Sydney, NSW
2006 – National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington DC, USA
2006 – Utopia, Flinders Lane Gallery, Melbourne, VIC
2004 – ‘Power of The Land’, Utopia Art Sydney, NSW
2004 – Fremantle Arts Centre, WA
2004 – Curtin University of Technology, WA
2004 – Ivan Dougherty Gallery, COFA, NSW
1999 – ?Wildflowers?, Mbantua Gallery, Alice Springs, NT.
1999 – New England Regional Art Museum, Armidale, NSW.
1999 – Red Desert Gallery, Eumundi, Queensland.
1999 – Flinders Lane Gallery- Melbourne, VIC.
1998 – Campbelltown Bicentennial Art Gallery, Campbelltown, NSW.
1998 – Chapman Gallery, Canberra, ACT
1998 – Utopia Art, Sydney, NSW.
1998 – Robert Steele Gallery, Adelaide, SA.
1997 – Instant Pictures, Utopia Art Sydney, NSW.
1996 – Fireworks Gallery, Brisbane, QLD.
1995 – Gloria Petyarre: On the Line, Utopia Art Sydney, NSW.
1994 – Utopia Art Sydney, NSW

Collections:
Campbell town City Art Gallery, Gold Coast City Art Gallery, Surfers Paradise
Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory, Darwin
National Gallery of Australia, Canberra
National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne
Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane
Powerhouse, Sydney
The Robert Holmes ‘Court Collection’, Perth
Westpac, New York, USA
Macquarie Bank
Singapore Art Museum
British Museum
Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collections, University of Virginia, Charlottesville

Goompi Ugerabah (Stephen Larncomb)
DOB: 11/06/1981
Skin name: Tjuparula
Language spoken: Gandawal
Aboriginal Tribe: Gurang Gurang / Nunucal
Aboriginal Name: Goompi (meaning Possum)

Goompi lives in Tweed Heads, NSW. He was influenced by his mother who is aboriginal and Islander Descent. His family name is Appo which originated from North Queensland. His great grandfather who was full blooded aboriginal and he was from North Queensland. His grandmother is also full blooded Islander from Lena Island in the South Sea.

Goompi has been painting since 2002, and shows great talent. Using a restrained colour palate and eye-catching graphic designs, Goompi is able to create exciting and engaging works of art.

His artworks are investment pieces and his black and white style has been tagged as corporate style art.

Goompi has travelled to France and America to exhibit his artworks and to showcase his cultural dances with his group, Bundjalung Kunjiel. Some of Goompi’s art admirers, who now own pieces of his artworks include The Princess, Benedicta of Denmark and The C.I.A in America, which both also witnessed the tribal dances of his troupe.

He has exhibited widely in South East Queensland and Northern New South Wales area and now in galleries around the world. Goompi’s driving force which he quoted is ‘I want to do my best to show our culture to the world and also teach our young to keep traditions alive as our culture that our ancestors practiced and lived is who we really are and that gives us our true identity.’

Goompi has practiced culture (song, dance and language) from a young age. He is a member and manages, Bundjalung Kunjiel Dance Troupe which has performed for dignitaries, members of Parliament and influential people in Australia.

RECENT HIGHLIGHTS
Opened the Steve Irwin Gala Dinner in Beverly Hills California
Guest Speaker for DLA Piper and Associates Law Firm in Brisbane

RECENT COMMISSIONS
SAAB Defence and Security
Sarina Russo Employment Services
Pacific Optics Qld
Your Town Prize Homes Qld

ACHIEVEMENTS
• Naidoc Gold Coast, QLD Council Chambers exhibition 2009, 2010, and 2011.
• National Parks and Wildlife, 2009 and 2011 Ballina Art Gallery, NSW.
• Exhibited at Crown Plaza Gold Coast,QLD. Reconciliation Week 2011.
• Permanent Collections of Corporate Culcha, Kirra QLD and the Gold Coast Titans NRL Excellence Centre, Robina QLD.
• Sold-out solo exhibition at Port Douglas in Jan 2014
• Sold-out solo exhibition at Noosa in March 2015
• Exhibited in “Dreaming Exhibition” in Bucharest Romania Oct 2015

CURRENT GALLERIES
Solo Exhibition at Gallery One on the Gold Coast – August 11
Australian and Oceanic Art Gallery in Port Douglas QLD
Nissarana Gallery in Noosa

GRACIE MORTON PWERLE
Born: 1956
From: Utopia N.TGracie is of the Eastern Amatyerre group and her country is Alhalkere and daughter of Myrtle Petyarre. She has always lives a traditional lifestyle, her education involved living and surviving in a desert environment, collecting bush foods and living off the land. Gracie still lives in the Utopia region but also occasionally spends time in Alice Springs with one of her two daughters.
Gracie gained recognition as an artist working in the medium of batik, exhibiting her work with the Utopia women in Australia and overseas.
Her work now is quite brilliant, comprised of laborious fine dots intricate patterns, all dimensional visual feeling. Her most commonly depicted subject is the bush plum. Gracie’s work has been exhibited throughout Australia and in many places around the world, particularly in Western Europe and in North America. Her works are highly sought after in many Australian Gallery.
GRANT LEY PAULSON
Grant was born in Murrunbinbi. Grant has been painting for 15 years.

He is known as ‘Salt water artist’, which tells of his style to paint mainly salt water creature.
His painting is in Gold Coast Exhibition Centre, Broadbeach, QLD; Minjungbal Museum, Tweed Heads, NSW; Tandanya Gallery, Adelaide, SA.
He came 2nd in Casino Beef week Art award in 2001.
His art works have been sold in Many galleries around Australia and a few pieces of his art works were sold in USA.

Grant demonstrates his talent in performance field. He played Didgeridoo at Fringe Festival in Adelaide and also did traditional Aboriginal performance in Currimbin Wildlife Sancutuary. Grant teaches Didigeridoos and as well as making them.

Janet Golder Kngwarreye
Tribe: Anmatyerre
Region: Utopia,Central Australia
Born: 1973

Janet was born on 15th November 1973 at Mulga Bore. Her country is Anmatyerre. She is the daughter of Margaret Golder and Sammy Pitjara and grand-daughter of Old Henry Pitjara, Angelina Ngale and Polly Ngale. Originally from Boundary Bore, she now lives in Alice Springs but regularly travels back to her country. She is married to Ronnie Bird, whose mother is renowned artist Ada Bird, and they have 4 children, Rochelle, Renady, Katrina and Troytan.
Janet is a wonderfully talented new artist who has been taught by her extended family of renowned artists.
She has been painting since 1997 and predominantly depicts ceremonial body paint ( Awelye )using fine dot work and linear patterns.

Exhibitions & Collections
• 2002 Mbantua Gallery USA exhibitions: New City Merchants, Knoxville, TN; Art and Soul Gallery, Nashville, TN; ‘The Cove Gallery’ Portland, OR; Urban Wine Works, Portland, OR; Mary’s Woods, Portland, OR, USA
• 2003 Mbantua Gallery USA exhibitions: New City Merchants, Knoxville, TN; Art and Soul Gallery, Nashville, TN; ‘The Cove Gallery’ Portland, OR; Mary’s Woods, Portland, OR, USA
• 2004 Aug-Sep – Mbantua Gallery USA exhibition; Knoxville, Tennessee

Mbantua Gallery Permanent Collection, Alice Springs

JEANNIE PETYARRE
Tribe: Anmatyerre
Region: Utopia, Central Australia
Born: 1956
Jeannie was born in 1956, to a family of well-known artists. Jeannie is the sister of the well-known Gloria Petyarre, Kathleen Petyarre, Ada Bird Petyarre, Violet Petyarre, Myrtle Petyarre and Nancy Petyarre.

Jeannie started painting batik work in the eighties. Her work is characterised by vibrant designs celebrating the spirit of the yam plant as it generates year after to feed the people.

‘Bush Medicine’ relates to the process of mixing various fruits and plants with animal fat to create medicine. These colourful styles were taught to her by her Aunt, the famous Emily Kame Kngwarreye.

Jeannie’s works feature in a number of collections including the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, and the Holmes a Court Collection, Perth, as well as many private collections worldwide.

Selected Exhibitions:
• 1989 Utopia Women’s Painting the first work on canvas
• 1990 A Picture Story exhibition of 88 works on silk from the Holmes a Court Collection by Utopia artists which toured Eire and Scotland
• 1993 Central Australia Aboriginal Art and Craft Exhibition, Araluen Centre, Alice Springs
• 2005 Cicada Trading, Illayda, Istanbul, Turkey;
• 2005 Cicada Trading, Milan, Italy;
• 2006 Cicada Trading, Dubai, United Arab Emirates;
• 2006 Cicada Trading, Annual Clear Lake Exhibition of Aboriginal Paintings, Houston, USA;
• 2006 Cicada Trading, Paris, France;
• 2006 Cicada Trading, Bahrain Art Society, the Kingdom of Bahrain;
• 2006 Cicada Trading, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.

Jeremy Devitt
Born: 1974

Jeremy “Mudjai” Devitt was born in Armidale, in 1974. He is a descendent of Nganyaywana, Daingutti (Dhanggatti), Gumbainga (Gumbaynggir) nations and has also English, Irish and Scottish heritage.
Devitt revealed his strong artistic talents as a child. Halfway through his HSC year he contracted Ross River Fever. It was then he decided to learn more about his culture and pursue painting. He has worked in many schools painting murals, playing didgeridoo and facilitating cultural workshops. He has been a member of Gungali Arts and Craft and Wadjar Art Group at Yarrawarra Aboriginal Corporation.

In 1997 Devitt went to Darwin for the Fulbright Symposium ‘Indigenous cultures in an interconnected world’, where he met Uncle Peter Manabaru, a traditional man from Barunga community ,vho allowed Devitt to oaint with him. In 1998 Devitt, together with Sean Ryan and Roy Newman, formed the Aboriginal dance group ‘Wadjarrnaru Dancers’. In 1999 under the guidance of elder and artist Uncle Joseph Beard-Wallace of Ramingining, Northern Territory, Devitt began painting a style called ‘Spiritway’. They painted together over several years and held an exhibition together at the Byron Bay Youth Centre in 2002. Devitt continues Beard-Wallace’s legacy.

Devitt has exhibited extensively both nationally and internationally including:
• The Hague, Den Haag, The Netherlands (2006);
• Roda Sten, Gothenburg, Sweden (2004);
• Helsingborg, Sweden (2004);
• Rouguid-Festival, Amsterdam, Holland (2004);
• The Outback Gallery, Sydney (2004).

Devitt is currently a student at the Eora College.

JOHN KELLY
John is a well known and respected artist from the Kempsey region of New South Wales. Each piece of John’s art expresses his Dainggatti aboriginal heritage and traditions of his people.
John’s works have been internationally recognised, including being selected by Nelson Mandela to recreate his charcoal drawings that were done during his imprisonment as well as his work being purchased by the New South Wales State Government for its collection. John was commissioned to create part of the stage backdrop for the prestigious Deadly Awards that celebrate outstanding achievements in many fields by indigenous Australians.
John’s works have been seen by many in local and international exhibitions and are widely sought after because of the vibrant tones and distinct traditional qualities his artwork convey.
JOHN TURNBULL
Language: Anaiwan Language Group
John is a well known and respected artist. Each piece of John’s art expresses his Kamilaroi aboriginal heritage, his spirituality and traditions of his people. John works with many mediums including terracotta, canvas, emu eggs and paperbark.
His people’s traditional country is in the Inverell region of New South Wales though he now resides in South East Queensland.
John produces artworks using different mediums and materials. John paints on canvas, pottery, wood and paper. John even painted a surfboard for his client. He enjoys painting animals on bright backgrounds using the canvas as a non written form of communication, telling stories that are relevant to him and his people.
John has been deeply involved with the Reconciliation movement.
John often supports local Reconciliation group by supplying artworks for fundraising.
The Gold Coast City Council has bought painting from John to send to China as part of their sister cities program. John often supports other local charities and his extended family as he hopes to pass on the benefits that come from his art and the life style. John hopes to portray aspects of his childhood, his life as it is no w and what he hopes for his children and family for the future in his art. He has been taught by older relatives from other language groups which makes his works even more diverse. John likes to mix styles as he sees his art as an expression of his Aboriginal Spirituality. His art work is his means of communicating his aboriginality to the wider community. Through his art he expresses who he is. It gives him an opportunity to promote awareness of Aboriginal Culture.
John’s work is widely sought after due to the earthy tones and distinct traditional qualities his artwork depicts.

John’s work has been featured in significant number of displays and exhibitions including:
• Wild Art ‘97
• Royal Queensland Art Society–Art Show- ‘98
• Art and Soul Festival 1999
• World Environment Day-Gecko 2000, 2001
• Environment and Sustainable Living Fair-Brisbane 2001
• Naidoc 2001 Exhibition held in collaboration with other Gold Coast Indigenous Artists-Robina Community Art Gallery
• Naidoc Family Day 2001
• Australia’s Parliament House
• Currently-Aboriginal Keeping Place-Armidale NSW

KATHLEEN PETYARRE
From: Utopia
Language: Anmatyerre
Clan: Alyawarre/Eastern Anmatyarre
Born: c1940
Kathleen is one of a famous family of aboriginal women painters Ada Bird, Violet, Myrtle and Gloria. She hails from the eastern desert community of Utopia, 230 kilometres northeast of Alice Springs. The region’s art movement began in the late 1970’s when a batik fabric-making workshop was introduced to the community. Kathleen joined up and was on her way to becoming one of the most widely recognised indigenous artists.Like other Central Australian and Western Desert Indigenous artists, Kathleen represents her Ancestor’s travels over Atnangker country and act as a visual depiction standing for something very important.
Kathleen’s subjects include Mountain Desert Lizard, Emu Dreaming and Bush Seed.Kathleen has featured in numerous exhibitions,(few other aboriginal artist can match that),all over Australia and around the world, some of which include – Sydney Craft Expo, Chicago Art 99 USA, San Francisco Art Exposition USA to name but a few.

Some of her Awards:
• 1996 Overall Winner of the Telstra 13th National Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Art Award, Darwin, NT, Australia.
• 1997 Overall Winner of the Visy Board Art Prize, the Barossa Vintage Festival Art Show, Nurioopta SA, Australia.
• 1998 Finalist, 1998 Seppelts Contemporary Art Award – Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney, NSW Australia.
• 1998 Winner, People’s Choice Award, 1998 Seppelts Contemporary Art Award, Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney, NSW, Australia.

Selected Exhibitions
• 1991 Royal Hibernian Academy, Dublin, Ireland
• 1995 Ludwig Forum für Internationale Kunst, Aachen, Germany
• 1998 Arnkerrthe – My Dreaming, Alcaston Gallery, Melbourne VIC, Australia, 24 July – 15 August
• 1999 Recent Paintings by Kathleen Petyarre, Coo-ee Gallery, Mary Place, Sydney, NSW, Australia, 4 – 21 November
• 2000 Kathleen Petyarre, Retrospective Exhibition, Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney, NSW, Australia
• 2000 New Directions in Contemporary Aboriginal Painting, Songlines Gallery, San Francisco CA, USA
• 2001 Genius of Place. The work of Kathleen Petyarre. Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney NSW, Australia
• 2002 Gallerie Commines, Paris, France
• 2006 Galerie Clément, Vevey, Switzerland
• 2006 Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College, New Hampshire, USA
• 2006 National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington DC, USA
• 2006 Prism – Contemporary Australian Art at the Bridgestone Museum of Art, Tokyo, Japan
• 2007 Galerie Rigassi, Bern, Switzerland
• 2007 Gallery Anthony Curtis, Boston MA, USA

Selected Collections
Musée des Arts d’Afrique et d’Océanie, Quai Branly, Paris, France
Musée des Confluences, Lyon, France
Kunsthaus – Sammlung Essl, Klosterneuburg, Austria
Aboriginal Art Museum, Utrecht, The Netherlands
The Vroom Collection, The Netherlands
Seattle Art Museum, Seattle WA, USA
The Kelton Foundation, Los Angeles CA, USA
Harvard University (Peabody-Essex Anthropology and Ethnology Museum), Salem MA, USA
The Levi-Kaplan Collection, Seattle WA, USA
The Kluge-Rhue Collection, University of West Virginia VA, USA
Museum Puri Lukisan, Ubud, Indonesia
National Gallery of Australia – Collection of H. M. Queen Elizabeth II, Canberra ACT, Australia
Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney NSW, Australia
Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide SA, Australia
The Kerry Stokes Collection, Perth WA, Australia
The Museum & Art Galleries of the Northern Territory, Darwin NT, Australia
Flinders University Art Museum, Adelaide SA, Australia
A.T.S.I.C. Collection, Adelaide SA, Australia
National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne VIC, Australia
University of South Australia Art Museum, Adelaide SA, Australia
Edith Cowan University, Perth WA, Australia

Kudditji Kngwarreye
Born: 1938 in Lallguora, Utopia,
Died: 23rd January 2017 in Alice Springs, Northern
Nationality: Eastern Anmatyerre
Other name: Goob , ” Rothko of The Bush ”
Known for: Painting, contemporary indigenous Australian art

Kudditji Kngwarreye (or ‘Goob’) was an Australian Aboriginal artist from the Utopia community in the Northern Territory. He was the brother (through kinship) of the late Emily Kame Kngwarreye and like his skin sister Emily, was one of the most prominent and successful artists in the history of contemporary indigenous.

Kngwarreye was born and lived in the Anmatyerre language group at Alhalkere in the Utopia community, about 250 km north east of Alice Springs.

His country was given the name Utopia by German Settlers, who transformed the land in to cattle stations. He became a skilled stockman, which in recent years we as a nation have begun to recognise the key role Aboriginal people played in the development in the cattle industry in Australia. Kudditji witnessed the success of Albert Namatjira, and experienced the 1967 referendum. Kudditji and his countrymen had their land claim approved in 1979 and throughout the years he has felt the effects of different government policies on Indigenous people of the Northern Territory.

Kngwarreye took up painting around 1986, his highly intuitive and gestural method of painting was not welcomed by galleries, and he was encouraged to paint in the fashionable style of the time, executing works with detailed infill. After seeing Emily Kame Kngwarreye catapult on to the Australian and International Art scene, Kudditji resumed his exploration in to the abstract which he continued until he ‘put down the brush’ in 2015. Kudditji participated in many international exhibitions and became known for his depictions of his Dreamings; their abstract imagery, bold colour use and intuitive interplay with space and form has cemented his name in the Aboriginal art scene.

But being a ground-breaking contemporary Indigenous Australian artist was just one chapter in this man’s life story. He had a traditional bush upbringing and worked as a stockman and mine worker for many years. He was also a traditional custodian of many important Dreamings, of the land and Men’s Business ceremonial sites located in his country at Utopia Station, about 230 km north east of Alice Springs.

Over the years his Dreamings have profoundly evolved into extraordinary juxtaposed colour fields, startling in both composition and hue. Harsh or soft and often surprising to the Western eye, his painterly style maps out the creation, his country, and his traditional Dreamings. While his spatial, painterly compositions have a Rothko-esque quality to them, the work of this Anmatyerre elder from the Northern Territory is clearly a unique Australian voice.

In 2006 Kudditji was named as one of the top 50 most collectible artists in Australia by Art Collector magazine. Kudditji actively painted from 1986 to 2013 when he became ill.

Kudditji continued to paint until 2015 when illness prevented him from painting any longer. Two years later in January 2017 he peacefully passed away in a retirement home in Alice Springs.

Wikipedia

Lionel Phillips
Lionel Phillips comes from the Trangie in Central Western New South Wales, Australia. His name means “Waterhole” in his local Warradjerri Aborginal dialect. Lionel started sketching 25 years ago, 10 years later he began to express his culture and tribal history on canvas. This was, in essence, the re-birthing experience of Lionel Phillips, a journey of self-discovery.

Lionel paints a wide variety of subject matter depicting his Indigenous folklore, dreamtime and his real life experiences. What you see in his work is a reflection of the wisdom and tradition of the oldest known inhabitants of the earth.

Luther Core
Born: 1978
Aboriginal Tribe: UKERABAH / People of Goanna
Aboriginal Name: Ballum (Black Cockatoo)
Nation: Bundjalung

Luther Core, a traditional dancer, performer, educator and leader of the Yugambeh language group, from the East Coast of Australia.
Luther Core lives in Tweed Heads, NSW. He was influenced by his mother who is aboriginal and Islander Descent. His great grandfather who was full blooded aboriginal and he was from North Queensland. His grandmother is also full blooded Islander from Lena Island in the South Sea.
Luther’s face paint symbolises his totem, “Bullum”, meaning Red Tailed Black Cockatoo – given to him by Yugambeh elders.
As a child, Luther travelled from the Gold Coast to North Queensland and Canberra to learn his ancestor’s traditional stories and dance before returning home to perform with his brothers. Now a father, Luther and his children perform together, each embodying past generations through wearing traditional garments and, painted with ochre, representing their individual animal totems. Luther’s love of the performing arts and Indigenous culture inspires his teaching and strengthens his desire to promote awareness about his cultural heritage. In addition to his performing life, Luther expresses his passion for country, family and culture through painting and photography.

MARGARET LEWIS NAPANGARDI
Margaret was born in 1956. Margaret is from Yuendumu in Northern Territory. Margaret has been painting since the late 80’s and sells her art works to many galleries.
Margaret paints Karnta (women’s) Dreaming for her country. Margaret is a full sister to celebrated painter Dorothy Napangardi whose artworks have featured in the exhibitions throughout Australia, the USA and Europe.
Margaret is a rising star and highly collectable. Margaret paints Salt on Mina Mina, Bush Fire at Mina Mina and Bush Mushroom.
MINNIE PWERLE
Minnie Pwerle (b.c. 1920) was born in Alyawarr country, about 180 km north east of Alice Springs. Minnie’s paintings reflect the design used for body painting in women’s ceremony – Awelye.Minnie has only recently been applying these stories to canvas. Her works are very bold and free flowing, and immediately capture the attention of art lovers. Minnie Pwerle’s main titles are Awelye, Bush Medicine and Bush Melon Seed, all of which convey her respect for her land, food and her people.
Ningurra Napurrula
Born: c.1938
Died: 2013
Birthplace: Watulka, Western Australia
Language: Pintupi
Region: Kintore

Ningura Napurrula Gibson was born around 1938 at Watulka in Western Australia, south of the modern Kiwirrkura community, Ningura Napurrula moved to Papunya in the early days of the settlement with her husband Yala Yala Gibbs Tjungurrayi, a renowned artists and highly respected Pintupi elder who held significant knowledge of his countries Dreaming stories (now deceased). In 1996 she was part of a group of elderly women from Kintore and Kiwirrkura who began painting for Papunya Tula Artists in their own right. Characteristic of her work is a strong dynamism and rich linear design-compositions created with heavy layers of acrylic paint. Ningura Napurrula depict designs associated with the rock hole sites of Palturunya and Wirrulnga, east of the Kiwirrkura Community (Mount Webb) in Western Australia. The concentric circles represent rock holes and the arcs represent the higher rocky outcrops near the site. The U shapes represent women camped at the site. Ningura depicts the mythological events of her ancestors. Her artwork focuses on the travels of her female ancestors, the sacred sites that they passed, and the mythological significance of the bush tucker that they collected. In mythological times, one old woman, Kutunga Napanangka, passed through this site during her travels towards the east. She passed through numerous sites along the way before arriving at the permanent water site of Muruntji, south west of Mt. Leibig. These travels and rituals help to explain the current customs and the ceremonial lives of these Pintupi women.

Ningura Napurrula was one of the 50 Australia’s most collectable artists by the Australian Art Collector magazine in 2007

Exhibitions
• 2000- Wiliam Mora Aboriginal Art
• 2001 – ‘Aborigena’ at the Palazzo Bricherasio, Turin, Italy
• 2002- Araluen Arts Centre, Alice Springs
• 2003- Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi, Melbourne
• 2003 – ‘Australian Contemporary Aboriginal Art in Prague’, Toskansky Place, Prague, Czech Republic
• 2003 – ‘Masterpieces from the Western Desert’, Gavin Graham Gallery, London, United Kingdom

Collections
Australian Institute for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies, Canberra
Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory, Darwin
National Gallery of Australia, Canberra
Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney
redrock gallery, Melbourne.

Awards:
• 2001, Finalist 18th Telstra NATSIAA
• 2002, 32nd Alice Prize, Highly Commended
• One of her works was depicted on an Australia Post postage stamp in 2003
In 2005 Ningura Napurrula was invited to paint a portion of the ceiling in the Musee du Quai Branly in Paris, France.
2017-2018: Work by Ningura Napurrula from the collectioln of Musée de Quai Branly is on view in the Louvre Abu Dhabi.

Paddy Carroll Tjungurrayi
Paddy Carroll’s mother is from the site of Winparrku near Haasts Bluff. Paddy grew up in this area, the family coming in to Haasts Bluff and Yuendumu to collect rations of bread and tea.
His father was shot by Europeans in the Coniston massacre of 1928.
Paddy Carroll began painting in about 1977 when John Kean was running Papunya Tula Artists and Paddy and his family were living at Three Mile Bore, an outstation of Papunya. David CORBY was probably influential in his starting to paint. Paddy’s extensive ceremonial knowledge is indicated by the range of Dreaming stories depicted in his paintings.Paddy Carroll once remarked to a journalist puzzling over the meaning of a painting’s iconography that ‘We have had to learn your language, now it is time you learned ours.’ Paddy and his second wife, Ruby Nangala, lived in their new house at Three Mile outstation, just north of Papunya until a few years ago that Paddy Carrol passed away.
(Aboriginal Artists of the Western Desert. By Vivien Johnson)
PANTJIYA NUNGARRAYI
Born: c.1936
Region: kiwirrkurra/ Kintore W.A
Language: Pintupi

Pantjiya Nungarrayi was born in the region of Haasts Bluff in 1936. Pantjiya commenced painting for Papunya Tula Artists in 1996 and is the wife of the now deceased artist, George Maxwell Jangala. After the death of her husband, Pantijiya returned yo her homeland, Kiwirrkurra.

Pantjiya only started to paint in the mid nineties. Her painting style is very distinctive using the three colours of black, white and yellow ochre. Pantjiya’s work is widely recognised and now her art products are highly collectable.

Pantjiya’s work is represented at the:
National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne
Aboriginal Art Museum, The Netherlands
Papunya Tula Artists
Artbank, Sydney

Exhibitions:
1996 Papunya Tula Artists Pty. Ltd. Alice Springs, Northern Territory, Australia.
1999 Flinders University of South Australia, Bedford Park, South Australia, Australia.
1999 Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
2000 Utopia Art Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
2000 Framed Gallery, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia.
2000 Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
2000 ‘Pintupi Women’, Papunya Tula Artists, Alice Springs, Northern Territory, Australia.
2001 Palm Beach Art Fair, Palm Beach, Florida, USA.
2001 Art House Gallery, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
2001 ‘Art of the Pintupi’, Tony Bond Aboriginal Art Dealer, Adelaide, South Australia,
2001 Indigenart, Subiaco, Western Australia, Australia.
2001 ‘Pintupi Exhibition’, Papunya Tula Artists, Alice Springs, Northern Territory, Australia.
2001 ‘Pintupi Women From Kintore’, Fireworks Gallery, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
2001 ‘Kintore and Kiwirrkura’, Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
2002 ‘Pintupi Mens’ and Womens’ Stories’, Indigenart, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
2002 19th Telstra National Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Art Award, Darwin, NT
2002 ‘Pintupi Artists’, Papunya Tula Artists, Alice Springs, Northern Territory, Australia.
2002 Melbourne Art Fair, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
2003 ‘Pintupi Art 2003’, Tony Bond Aboriginal Art Dealer, Adelaide, South Australia,
2003 ‘Recent Paintings By The Women Artists Of Kintore And Kiwirrkura’, Gallery Gabrielle
Pizzi, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
2003 ‘Pintupi Art From The Western Desert’, Indigenart, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
2004 ‘Works from Kintore and Kiwirrkura’, Alison Kelly Gallery, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
2004 ‘Ma Yungu/Pass It On’, Framed Gallery, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia.
2005 ‘Pintupi Women’, Indigenart, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
2005 ‘Papunya Tula – the next generation’, Walkabout Gallery, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
2005 ‘Aboriginal Art of the Australian Desert’, Anima Mundi Gallery, Lyons, Colorado, USA.
2006 ‘A Particular Collection’, Utopia Art Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
2006 ‘Paintings By Papunya Tula Artists’, Suzanne O’Connell Gallery, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
2009 Parcours des Mondes, Arts d’Australie, Stephane Jacob, Paris, France.
2010 Papunya Tula Artists Community, Utopia Art, Sydney.
2011 Papuya Tula Women’s Art, at the Maitland Regional Art Gallery, NSW.

Peter Overs
BORN: 1976 in Brisbane, QLD
LANGUAGE: Kamilaroi
REGION: South-West Queensland
Traditional Name: Dhinawan (meaning Emu)

Peter was born in Brisbane 1967, and grew up in Dirranbandi (Aboriginal word for “Frogs round the water hole”) south/west Queensland.

His mother is from the Kamilaroi People. He is of the Mirri people (Lignum bush people) who dwelled on the banks of the Balonne river.

Since young, Peter was influenced by his people’s cultural and traditional stories as well as his love of exploring his county and fishing (specially yabbies)

Peter has been painting for over 24 years, and his paintings are mainly based on revitalising his Kamilaroi culture of the local area, the Fauna and Flora, water holes, bush tracks, Yabby Hole Dreaming ,and the Emu & Quandong Dreaming.

He has worked with and is inspired by great artists such as Dorothy Napangangi, Gracie Morton, Walala Tjapaltjarri, Dr. George Tjapaltjarri, Turkey Tolson and Clifford Possum.

Peter was mentored by Ronnie Tjampitjinpa who encouraged Him to paint his own Dreaming stories relating to his grandfather’s county.

Having lived all over Australia, Peter now resides in Alice Springs.

Selected Exhibitions:
• 2004 Solo Exhibition, Melbourne and Tasmania, Australia.
• 2003 – 2006 Group Exhibitions, redrock gallery, Melbourne, Australia.
• 2006 Solo Exhibition, redrock gallery, Melbourne, Australian
• 2007 November, redrock gallery, Group Exhibition, International Art Expo, Beijing, P.R China

Polly Ngale
Born: c.1936
Language Group: Anmatyerre
Area: Utopia, Central Australia

Polly Ngale, is one of the most accomplished, senior Utopia artis.

She is a sister of Angelina Ngale (Pwerle) and Kathleen Ngale, and like her sisters, Polly predominantly paints layered images of the Anwekety (conkerberry, also referred to as the bush plum) using bright shades of reds, whites, yellows and oranges, capturing colours of different seasons.
Polly is a senior custodian of the Bush Plum Dreaming story.
Polly lives a traditional life with her family at Utopia,North East of Alice Spring.

Group Exhibitions & Collections
• 1989 Utopia Women’s Paintings, the First Works on Canvas, A Summer Project, 1988-89, S. H. Ervin Gallery, Sydney.
• 1990 ‘Utopia – A Picture Story,’ an exhibition of 88 works on silk from the Holmes a Court Collection by Utopia artists which toured Eire and Scotland
• 2000 Arts d’Australie Stephane Jacob / Espace Mezzo – Avenue des Champs-Elysees, Paris; Arts d’Australie, Stephane Jacob / Air France, Paris
• 2003 20th Telstra National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art Award, Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory, Darwin
• 2008 Emily and Her Legacy, Hillside Gallery, Tokyo with Coo-ee Art Sydney in conjunction with the opening of the landmark retrospective exhibition Utopia – the Genius of Emily Kngwarreye at the National Art Centre, Tokyo, Japan
• 2008 Dreamings – the Land, Outback Aboriginal Art, Caulfield, Vic
Mbantua Gallery Permanent Collection, Alice Springs
The Holmes a Court

RONNIE TJAMPITJINPA
Born: c1943
Tribe: Pintupi
Language: Pintupi
Region: Walungurru (Kintore), Ininti, Alice Spring

Ronnie was born around 1943 near Muyinnga, about 100 km west of the Kintore Range in the Northern Territory. His family moved extensively throughout Pintupi Country living the traditional ways his people have lived for over 40000 years..

It was during Ronnie’s time at Papunya that he started to take an interest in the Papunya Tula Desert Art Movement (formed in the early 70’s).

Ronnie soon emerged as one of Papunya Tula’s major artists. His work reflects his direct ties with his culture, retaining a purity that many other Aboriginal artists have not achieved. Ronnie’s work follows the strict Pintupi style including the strong circle motif joined together by connecting lines.

1996 sees Ronnie as one of the Central Deserts most sought after artists, producing stunning linear work. His work is currently in high demand fetching high prices at the Sotheby’s Auction Rooms in Melbourne, Australia. During 1980s, he was the Chairman of the Kintore Outstation Council, devoting a lot work on land claims for Ininti.

Ronnie and his wife, Mary Brown Napangardi are currently spending time between Alice Springs and his home in Kintore.

Ronnie Tjampitjinpa was the winner of the 1988 Alice Springs Art Prize

COLLECTIONS:
National Gallery of Australia, Canberra
National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne
Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth
Museums and Art Galleries of the Northern Territory, Darwin
Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide
Bendigo Art Gallery, Victoria
Araluen Arts Centre, Alice Springs
Robert Holmes a Court
Medibank Private Collection
Supreme Court of the Northern Territory, Darwin
Artbank
Flinders University Art Museum, Adelaide
Donald Khan, U.S.A.
Richard Kelton Foundation, Santa Monica, U.S.A.
Musee National des Arts Africains et Oceaniens, Paris, France
Groninger Museum, The Netherlands

SELECTED EXHIBITIONS:
1982 Brisbane Festival, Brisbane
1983 Mori Gallery, Sydney
1986 Galerie Dusseldorf, Germany
1986 Aboriginal Arts Australia, Canberra
1987, 1988, 1989, 1993, 1996 Gallery Gabriella Pizzi, Melbourne
1988 Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide
1988 Expo ’88, Brisbane
1991, 1993, Chapman Gallery, Canberra
1991 Australian National Gallery, Canberra
1991 Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami, U.S.A.
1992 Aboriginal Artists Agency, Sydney
1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1997, 1998 Araluen Arts Centre, Alice Springs
1992 Ballarat Fine Art Gallery, Ballarat
1993 Art Gallery of N.S.W., Sydney
1993 Art Museum, Armidale, N.S.W.
1993 Art Gallery of W.A., Perth
1994 National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne
1994 Utopia Gallery, Sydney
1994 Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi, Milan and Palermo, Italy
1994 Museum Villa Stuck, Munich, Germany
1995 Alcaston Gallery, Melbourne
1996 – 2006 Twenty-Five Years and Beyond: Papunya Tula Painting, Flinders University Art Museum, Adelaide
1998 Jinta Gallery, Sydney
1999 – 2001 Spirit Country, San Francisco, touring
1999 Flinders Art Museum Flinders University, Adelaide
1999 Embassy of Australia, Washington, U.S.A.
1999 Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, U.S.A.
2000 Aboriginal Art Galleries of Australia, Melbourne
2000 Papunya Tula Genesis and Genius, Australia Gallery, N.S.W.
2000 Aboriginal Lawman- Masterworks, Australian Exhibition Centre, Chicago, U.S.A.
2001, 2003 Chapel off Chapel
2009 Size Matters, Kate Owen Gallery, Sydney, NSW
2009 The Dreamers, Art Gallery of NSW.
2008 From the air, Fireworks Gallery, Brisbane, QLD.
2004 DREAMTIME: The Dark and The Light, Sammlung Essl, Austria.
2003 Bushfire, Fireworks Gallery, Brisbane QLD.
2011 Tjukurrtjanu- Origins of Western Desert Art, National Gallery of Victoria.
2015 Ronnie Tjampitjinpa, Art Gallery of New South Wales

Russell Kereama – Ngati Raukawa
Russell Kereama was born in Fielding, New Zealand and resides in Byron Bay, Australia.

His tribal roots reflect greatly throughout his bold works, embracing a rhythmic flow of vibrant colours and abstract style which aims to reflect three main elements – earth, sky and water.

Russell grew up in Hastings but is currently residing in Australia. A self-taught artist he worked for 10 years as an art agent and was surprised when people in his artistic circles found his work exciting.

Their positive assessments spurred him to delve deeper into his artistic abilities and discover his hidden talents. Many interior design companies have purchased and commissioned Russell to create works for high end clients. Russell’s work regularly features in interior design magazines.

There are earthly elements at work in his paintings, inspired by life itself , he find never-ending inspiration in the world around him, and the interaction between man and nature. Also, the tribal roots of his family, provides him with a constant source of pleasure, which in turn, manifests itself in his artwork.

Russel’s artworks appeal to anyone that is not afraid to use colour, movement and texture as a backdrop to their own distinctive decorating style.

SARRITA KING
DOB: 5th March 1988
BORN: Adelaide,South Australia
LANGUAGE GROUP: Gurindji
COMMUNITY: Katherine, NT
Sarrita King was born in Adelaide, South Australia in 1988 and grew up in Darwin in the Northern Territory. She is the younger sister to fellow artist, Tarisse King and daughter to the late highly regarded artist, William King Jungala (1966 – 2007). Sarrita and Tarisse are second-generation painters whose inspiration and encouragement to paint came from their father. Sarrita and Tarisse have created brilliant works that add their own personal feelings and ideas stemming from their father’s teachings.
Sarrita’s father, William King, was an accomplished artist from the Gurindji tribe located near Katherine in the Northern Territory. Most of his family still live in the Nobrthern Territory, specifically in Katherine.
Sarrita spent most of her youth in Darwin, where her mother still resides. It is here that her connection to her Aboriginality and subsequently the connection to her land was able to grow. Her exposure to the elements and the extreme landscape has provided the thematic for her works of art since she began painting at age 16. Rolling sand hills, lightning, thunderstorms, torrential rain, fire, desert and tangled bush are all scathing environmental factors that shaped her fore father’s lives, and also her own. Depicting these elements in her paintings, Sarrita provides a visual articulation of the earth’s language.
Stylistically, Sarrita utilises traditional Aboriginal techniques such as ‘dotting’ but also incorporates unorthodox techniques taught to her by her father as well as self developed practices. Her art is a fusion of past, present and future and represents the next generation of artists who have been influenced by both their indigenous history and current Western upbringing.
Sarrita now spends most of her time is her father’s studio working on her art. Sarrita’s inspiration for her art is the amazing environment in which she grew up in within the Northern Territory. Sarrita also reflects on much of her experiences with family members, especially her father who taught her about her Aboriginal heritage, culture and the connection to our world in general. Sarrita’s father William King passed away on December 2nd, 2007 but his memory and incredible talent lives on and continues through his daughter’s art.

Major Exhibitions
• 2014, Aug – Sarrita & Tarisse King Japingka Gallery, Freemantle
• 2014, April – The King Sisters: Pop Art Red Desert Dreamings, Melbourne
• 2013, June – Major Auction Castor Hara, Paris
• 2013, Mar – Art Hong Kong Hong Kong
• 2013, Feb – The King Sisters Japingka Gallery, Freemantle
• 2012, Nov – Country of Kings Red Desert Dreamings, Melbourne
• 2012, Nov – Art Expo Singapore
• 2012, Oct – Collaboration Gallery 577, Melbourne
• 2012, Aug – Aboriginal Art Butler Goode Gallery, Sydney
• 2012, March – Contemporary Art Art Curial, Paris
• 2011, Nov – Language of the Earth Japingka, Freemantle, WA
• 2011, Oct – Contemporary Art (Art Curial, France)
• 2011, Feb – Connections , First Solo Exhibition (Gallery 577, Melbourne)
• 2010, Nov – Contemporary Auction (Art Curial, France)
• 2010, – Rising Stars, Tarisse & Sarrita King (Aboriginal Art Galleries, Sydney)
• 2010, Aug – The King Sisters (Mason Art Gallery)
• 2010, – First Artist in Residence (Newington College, Sydney)
• 2010, – In Our Father’s Eyes: (Aboriginal Dreamtime Gallery, LA)
• 2010, Jul – Contemporary Auction (Art Curial, France)
• 2010, April – Fire & Lightning (Central Art, Alice Springs)
• 2010, Feb – The King Sisters (Red Dessert Dreaming Gallery, Mel)
• 2009, Nov – Art Curial auction and exhibition (Art Curial, France)
• 2009, Sep – William, Tarisse & Sarrita King, (Aboriginal Art Galleries, Sydney)
• 2009, Nov – Kaminabend mit Tarisse & Sarrita (Brit’s Art, bach-Palenberg, Germany)
• 2009 – The King Sisters (Blue Gum Gallery, QVB, Syd)
• 2009 – The 3 Kings (Bennelong Gallery, Syd)

TARISSE KING
DOB: September 4th 1986
BORN: Adelaide,South Australia
LANGUAGE: Gurindji
COMMUNITY GROUP: Katherine, NT
Tarisse King was born on September 4th 1986. She is the elder sister to fellow artist, Sarrita King and daughter to the late, highly regarded artist, William King Jungala (1966 – 2007). Sarrita and Tarisse are second-generation painters whose inspiration and encouragement to paint came from their father. Sarrita and Tarisse have created brilliant works that add their own personal feelings and ideas stemming from their father’s teachings.
Tarisse spent most of her youth in Darwin, where her mother still resides. It is here that her connection to her Aboriginality and subsequently the connection to her land was able to grow. Her exposure to the elements and the extreme landscape has provided the thematic for her works of art since she began painting at age 17.
Tarisse’s father, William King, was an accomplished artist from the Gurindji tribe, in the Northern Territory. Most of his family still live in the Northern Territory, specifically in Katherine. He spent most of the last 20 years of his life in Adelaide. Tarisse moved to Adelaide at age 16 to pursue a career in hospitality. However living with her father meant she was exposed to the world of art. Over time her involvement in her father’s art grew until she eventually began experimenting with her own designs and techniques.
William King passed away on December 2nd, 2007. Today, Tarisse continues to paint imagery passed down to her from her father’s stories and teachings about fire, desert, bush and water and the environmental factors that shaped her fore father’s lives which Tarisse says helps connect her with her family and culture. Depicting these elements in her paintings, Tarisse provides a visual articulation of the earth’s language.
Tarisse also paints her own unique designs which reflect her on going exploration of the world around her and her Aboriginal culture. She has been included in over 20 exhibitions, is represented in galleries in every Australian state, is included in many high profile Australian and international art collections, has been auctioned successfully through Paris’ Art Curial and is scheduled to embark on an exhibition tour of the United States of America. With so many accolades to her name at such a young age, Tarisse’s potential to build on an already outstanding career is more than promising.

Selected Exhibitions
• 2010 Fire & Lightning first exhibition on the Northern Territory, King Sisters Tarisse and Sarrita, Central Art, Alice Springs
• 2010, Rising Stars, Tarisse and Sarrita King, Aboriginal Art Galleries, Sydney, NSW
• 2010, In Our Father’s Eyes: works by sisters Tarisse and Sarrita King, Aboriginal Dreamtime Art Gallery, Los Angeles
• 2010, Fire & Lightning: Sarrita and Tarisse King, Central Art, Alice Springs
• 2009, William, Tarisse and Sarrita King, Aboriginal Art Galleries, Sydney
• 2009, Kaminabend mit Tarisse and Sarrita King, Aboriginal Art Galerie, Brit‘s Art, Übach-Palenberg, Germany
• 2009, The Three Kings, Kate Owen Gallery, Sydney, NSW

Group Exhibitions
• 2010, Canterbury Art Exhibition, Canterbury, Victoria
• 2008, Aboriginal Art Auction, Customs House, Sydney
• 2008, Canterbury Art Exhibition, Canterbury, Victoria
• 2008, The EWB exhibition, 14 exhibitions across Australia

Major Exhibitions & Collections
• 2014, Aug – Sarrita & Tarisse King Japingka Gallery, Freemantle
• 2014, April – The King Sisters: Pop Art Red Desert Dreamings, Melbourne
• 2013, June – Major Auction Castor Hara, Paris
• 2013, Mar – Art Hong Kong Hong Kong
• 2013, Feb – The King Sisters Japingka Gallery, Freemantle
• 2012, Nov – Country of Kings Red Desert Dreamings, Melbourne
• 2012, Nov – Art Expo Singapore
• 2012, Oct – Collaboration Gallery 577, Melbourne
• 2012, Aug – Aboriginal Art Butler Goode Gallery, Sydney
• 2012, March – Contemporary Art Art Curial, Paris
• 2011, Nov – Language of the Earth Japingka, Freemantle, WA
• 2011, Oct – Contemporary Art (Art Curial, France)
• 2011, Feb – Connections , First Solo Exhibition (Gallery 577, Melbourne)
• 2010, Nov – Contemporary Auction (Art Curial, France)
• 2010, – Rising Stars, Tarisse & Sarrita King (Aboriginal Art Galleries, Sydney)
• 2010, Aug – The King Sisters (Mason Art Gallery)
• 2010, – First Artist in Residence (Newington College, Sydney)
• 2010, – In Our Father’s Eyes: (Aboriginal Dreamtime Gallery, LA)
• 2010, Jul – Contemporary Auction (Art Curial, France)
• 2010, April- Fire & Lightning (Central Art, Alice Springs)
• 2010, Feb – The King Sisters (Red Dessert Dreaming Gallery, Mel)
• 2009, Nov – Art Curial auction and exhibition (Art Curial, France)
• 2009, Sep – William, Tarisse & Sarrita King, (Aboriginal Art Galleries, Sydney)
• 2009, Nov – Kaminabend mit Tarisse & Sarrita (Brit’s Art, Bach-Palenberg, Germany)p
• 2009 – The King Sisters (Blue Gum Gallery, QVB, Syd)
• 2009 – The 3 Kings (Bennelong Gallery, Syd)

TROY LITTLE
Troy was born in Northern New South Wales in an area known as Bundjalung Country. He is a member of the Bundjalung people.
He started painting around 1999, designing a unique three-dot system that gives his art work 3-dementional effect. He established himself as a competent and reputable artist. He also donated time and his art to community groups including the Queensland Museum, state primary and high schools.
Troy was placed second in the Moreton Bay Dreaming sector of the professional category of the annual Robin O’Chin Arts Awards for 2001.
He believes as indigenous artists, they should all have the right to express their culture and beliefs through various art forms, be it painting, music or dance.
He also says “I have chosen to express myself, my culture and my beliefs through the images of society and through ancient tradition passed on to me by my elders, family and friends”.

Achievements and Exhibitons
• 2001 Horizons fine art gallery exhibition
• 2001 Goodwill games exhibition
• 2002 Chogm Coolum Hyatt Regency exhibition
• 2002 Runner up Robin O’Chin art awards
• 2002 19th Telstra national art award
• 2003 19th Telstra national art award entrant
• 2003 Burralga art exhibitions
• 2003 Kate Challis Raka awards entrant
• 2004 Robin O’Chin art awards
• 2004 College of hospitality Nice, France
• 2007 Botix art gallery
• 2008 8th Biennial Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander art show
• 2009 The River Run Black art exhibition, Yamba NSW
• 2009 Global voice for women Sportimist International
• 2010 Brisbane City Council – Gail Mcintosh

WALANGKURA NAPANANGKA
DOB: c.1946 -2014
BORN: PAPUNYA
REGION: TJITURULNGA, west of Kintore, in the remote area between the Northern Territory and Western Australia
SKIN NAME: NAPANANGKA
LANGUAGE: PINTUPI

Walangkura Napanangka was born in 1946 at Tjiturulnga. She moved to Haasts Bluff before finally settling in Kintore, west of Alice Springs. Walangkura’s family was amongst a group of Pintupi people who made their way to the Ikuntji settlement (Haasts Bluff) in 1956. They walked hundreds of kilometres from west of the salt lake of Karrkurutinjinya (Lake Macdonald) to access the supplies of food and water on offer at the settlement. The family returned to their homelands community of Walungurru in 1981. Walangkura now resides in Kintore with her husband and fellow artist Johnny Yungut Tjupurrula. Her mother, Inyuwa Nampitjinpa and sister, Pirrmangka Napanangka, both deceased were also painters. Her father was Tutuma Tjapangati.

Walangkura began her painting career through participating in the historic Kintore-Haasts Bluff collaborative canvas project ‘Minyma Tjukurrpa’ in 1995. Her paintings exude a powerful energy, recreating the creation stories and ceremonial sites associated with the Tjukurrpa of her Pintupi homelands.

In January 2007, Walangkura Napanangka was included in the Australian Art Collector’s list of the 50 most collectable artists. Her work is represented in the collections of the National Gallery of Australia, Art Gallery of New South, Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory, Artbank and The Kelton Foundation.

SELECTED EXHIBITIONS:
1997 – 2002 Araluen Arts Centre, Alice Springs 1998 ‘Sztuka Aborygenow’ – (Art of the Aborigines), Warsaw, Poland
1998 The Desert Mob Art Show, Arulen Center, Alice Springs.
1999 Utopia Art Sydney; Flinders University Art Museum
1999 Flinders Art Museum, Flinders University, Adelaide
2000 Pintupi, Alice Springs
2000 Papunya Tula: Genesis and Genius at the Art Gallery of NSW
2000 Aboriginal Art, Galerie Bahr, Speyer, Germany
2000 Genesis And Genius, Art Gallery Of New South Wales, Sydney
2001 Dreamscapes – Contemporary Desert Art, Mostings Hus, Frederiksberg, Denmark
2001 Size Doesn’t Matter- Papunya Tula Painting 1997-2001, William Mora Galleries
2002 Melbourne Art Fair
2003 Mythology and Reality, S.H Ervin Gallery, Sydney
2003 Solo Exhibition – Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi, Melbourne
2003 Aboriginal Art 2003, Scott Livesey Art Dealer, Melbourne
2003 Recent Paintings By The Women Artists Of Kintore And Kiwirrkura, Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi.
2004 Walankura Napanangka, Utopia Art Society
2004 Pintupi Art 2004
2004 Papunya Tula Artists, Gabrielle Pizzi, Melbourne
2004 Chapman Gallery Canberra; The Inner And The Outer
2004 Melbourne Art Fair 2004
2005 Across Skin – Women Artists of the Western Desert, Japingka Gallery, Fremantle
2008 – Red Desert Gallery, Eumundi QLD

YONDEE(meaning Black Goanna)Shane Hansen
Yondee is a Noongar man from Western Australia, now based in Ipswich in Queensland. He was born in 1964 in Dumbleyung, 270km south of Perth. The name Dumbleyung is derived from the Aboriginal word “Dambeling” means large lake, and refers to the lake nearby which is the largest in south west WA. His works are abstract in their presentation but narrative in their content.Yondee uses colours which represent certain feelings and dreamings. Blues, greens and purples are used for tranquillity and motivation, reds and oranges for warmth and healing, white is used to give spirit, whilst browns or ochres brings back into context recognition as an Aboriginal artist. He wishes to continue the stories of his grandfather.
Yondee has painted with the Campfire group of Aboriginal artists in Brisbane as well as exhibiting his work in a number of galleries in Western Australia, NSW, Queensland and overseas (USA and Ireland).